writingfromthesoul.net

deep play
EVERY TWO WEEKS, I send out a writing tip and three soul-inviting prompts as inspiration for you to freewrite, either alone with your timer or in a gathering of writer friends. The resulting deep play opens up whole new landscapes of creative possibility for our writing and our lives. If you are new to this kind of writing practice, have a look at the freewriting principles. And to take your writing to the next level, check out the mentoring sessions I offer, which are helpful whether you are working on a book or just beginning to find your voice.   [read more]

WRITING TIP: Give up on originality…

Writing Tip: Give up on originality...

WRITING PROMPT: One degree away from starting…

Writing prompt: One degree away from starting...

WRITING PROMPT: Something always matters…

Writing prompt: Something always matters...

WRITING PROMPT: We save each other…

We save each other...

WRITING TIP: Stop working on your writing.

WRITING TIP: Stop working on your writing.
One of the most common reasons to procrastinate diving into a writing prooject that calls us? It sounds like work — and we already work too much. To get passed the block, you’ve got to stop thinking of the writing as work. And when your writing starts to feel like work, you’ve got to take a break. Bestselling author Neil Gaiman has used this strategy to teach himself to write — and live — out of joy. Says Gaiman: “I learned to write by writing. I tended to do anything as long as it felt like an adventure, and to stop when it felt like work – which meant that life did not feel like work.” A good thing to reflect on: What can you do right now to make your writing feel more like play?

WRITING PROMPT: This is not a battleground…

WRITING PROMPT: This is not a battleground...

WRITING PROMPT: The wisdom to know the difference…

WRITING PROMPT: The wisdom to know the difference.

WRITING PROMPT: Make a mistake here…

WRITING PROMPT: Make a mistake here...

WRITING TIP: Make a mess.


“To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk,” said Thomas Edison. What this means for your writing: your creativity depends on your ability to not only tolerate the junk you write when you do free writes — you need to value it, dig through it, recombine and relook with fresh eyes that leave aside your standards of what is good or lyrical or worthy. Those judgments only hinder inventiveness, something you want unchecked in the generative stages of writing. So lock your critic in a closet and get to work making a mess, whether it’s your first draft or your tenth. After all, as Thomas Edison put it, “Just because something doesn’t do what you planned it to do doesn’t mean it’s useless.”

WRITING PROMPT: Dark, still waters…

WRITING PROMPT: Dark, still waters...